News

GLENWOOD SPRINGS BIKE MYSTERY

Glenwood Springs—If your bicycle was stolen recently, the Glenwood Springs police department may have it.  20 bikes have been left around town in the last month but according to the Glenwood Springs Police Department, no thefts have been reported. Police Chief Terry Wilson says the department is trying to return the bikes to their rightful owners.  Adding to the mystery of the abandoned bikes is the fact that no bike thefts have been reported in neighboring towns like Carbondale or Rifle.  Wilson says it’s not uncommon for bike thefts to go unreported for weeks at a time.  If you have information about the abandoned bikes, call the Glenwood Springs P.D. at 945-6500.

GARCO S.O. NEEDS NEW IMPOUND LOT

Rifle—Garfield County desperately needs a new impound lot for towed vehicles.  Sheriff Lou Vallario went before the county commissioners this morning to approve the acquisition of a piece of land near the annex office in Rifle.  Vallario says the old impound lot near the Rifle/Garfield County Airport is being used for other purposes.  He says the lot next to the annex would work nicely.   Vallario says the estimated 600 thousand dollar cost of creating a new impound lot could be reduced to around 450 thousand dollars if it isn’t paved.

EPA MINE SPILL

Denver—(AP)  Federal officials say the yellow plume of contaminated wastewater that spilled from an abandoned Colorado mine states is three times larger than originally estimated. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says 3 million gallons of wastewater laced with lead and arsenic, spilled from the Gold King Mine and turned the Animas River a mustard yellow last week. The agency initially estimated 1 million gallons escaped.The river flows through New Mexico and Utah and ultimately into Lake Mead.The EPA has so far been unable to determine whether humans or aquatic life face health risks from the pollution, but an agency official said Sunday that she doesn't believe wildlife is in great danger.No drinking-water contamination has been reported because water utilities shut down their intake valves ahead of the plume to keep it out of their systems. 

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