News, April 30th

FATAL DISEASE FOUND IN GARFIELD COUNTY HORSE

Garfield County—A horse in Garfield County may have to be killed or permanently isolated due to contracting ‘equine infectious anemia.’  According to the Colorado Department of Agriculture, the disease can cause fluid to accumulate on the chest or legs, high fever, anemia and emaciation.  Officials say the horse will either have to be euthanized or put out to pasture by itself to prevent the disease from spreading.  The department says infectious anemia is spread through biting flies and there is no vaccine.  The department says another horse in Weld County had to be put down after testing positive for rabies.  Rabies can be prevented with a vaccination but once it’s contracted, there’s no cure.

PARACHUTE CREEK POLLUTION UNDER CONTROL

Parachute—Despite public skepticism, state health officials say the pollution in Parachute Creek is under control and no one’s health is in imminent danger.  That was the conclusion from last night’s community meeting in Parachute.  A large crowd gathered at the Grand Valley Fire Protection District Building to get an update on the hydrocarbon leak at Parachute Creek that was discovered over six weeks ago.  Even though cancer-causing benzene was among the chemicals found in the liquid natural gas leak, the expert panel insisted the pollution is under control and none of the creek water has entered the Colorado River.  The panel was made up officials from the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Garfield County Public Health and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

HOLY CROSS CUSTOMERS COULD PAY HIGHER BILLS UNDER STATE PLAN

Glenwood Springs—Holy Cross Energy customers may be paying more for power under a plan being proposed by state lawmakers.  Senate Bill 252 would impact customers of all rural cooperative electric associations to offset the cost of increasing renewable energy use.  The measure requires all electricity co-ops to get 20 percent of their energy from renewable sources like wind and solar by 2020.  The previous requirement was 10 percent.  The bill limits consumer rate increases to just 2 percent.  The bill also adds coal mine methane and gas produced from solid waste to the mix of renewable sources. 

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