News, July 11th

GOVERNOR HICKENLOOPER IN GLENWOOD FRIDAY

Glenwood Springs—Education, health care, the economy…what do you want to talk about with Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper?  He’ll be in Glenwood Springs tomorrow afternoon for a one hour chat with folks.  The Governor’s informal discussion begins at  1:30 in the Glenwood Springs council chambers. Space is limited and people are being asked to RSVP as soon as possible.

HICKENLOOPER SUPPORTS EDUCATION FUNDING MEASURE

Denver—He signed the bill allowing it to appear on the November ballot but there were doubts about Governor Hickenlooper’s personal support of the tax increase to fund public schools.  Yesterday, the Governor cleared the air by officially endorsing the school finance act.  If approved by voters, the school finance act will raise close to a billion dollars in taxes for public education.

PITKIN COUNTY AIRPORT CUTTING BACK

Aspen—They’re making some cutbacks at the Aspen/Pitkin County Airport.  According to Airport Director Jim Elwood, the cuts are coming from the Federal Aviation Administration.  Starting tonight, the F-A-A is cutting back the evening hours of the control tower by two hours.  Elwood says the Sardy Field tower will be staffed from 7 in the morning until 8pm.  He says during the off hours, all air traffic communication will come from Denver.

COLORADO FORECLOSURE FLAP

DENVER (AP) — The Colorado attorney general’s office is investigating whether law firms specializing in foreclosures are inflating fees that homeowners must repay to avoid losing their houses. According to court documents, law firms only pay $25 for someone to post official notices on a property advising homeowners of their rights, but some firms are charging as much as $150 in the bills they file with the public trustee overseeing the foreclosure case. The fees are limited to the amount a lawyer actually paid or was billed for a service or expense such as mailing costs, property inspections, title searches and court charges.

MARIJUANA FARMERS MARKET

BOULDER (AP) — A marijuana businessman wants to start a specialized farmers market for pot in Boulder.Justin Hartfield says his plan would offer vendors better access to consumers and give consumers more choices. State laws on retail weed sales and  businesses could make the venture too difficult under current regulations.

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