News, June 6th

GARFIELD COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DISCUSS 4-MILE ROAD PROJECT WITH CONCERNED CITIZENS

Glenwood Springs—The plans to blow up a rock wall on Four Mile Road near Black Diamond Road don’t make sense to most people in the neighborhood. Several concerned residents in the area expressed their concerns to the Garfield County Board of Commissioners during a special meeting this morning. The general consensus among residents was attempts to make the area known as “Deadman’s Curve” safer would actually encourage drivers to speed up. The board agreed to take all concerns into consideration before they vote on the project June 17th.

GLENWOOD CITY COUNCIL ADOPTS ACCESS CONTROL PLAN

Glenwood Springs—The controversial Highway 82/Grand Avenue Access Control Plan was adopted last night by the Glenwood Springs City Council. The vote was 6 to 0. After lengthy discussion, the council agreed to scrap the plans to reconfigure the intersection at 15th and Grand in front of the high school.

TRAVELING SURGEONS BEING USED AT ASPEN VALLEY HOSPITAL

ASPEN (AP) – Traveling doctors are being asked to fill a void at Aspen Valley Hospital while Dr. Bill Rodman finds a surgeon to replace Dr. John Schultz, who was fired last month. Schultz has worked under contract with Rodman since 2004. He was abruptly forced out of the practice effective May 2 over a personality clash.
Schultz will be allowed to see his patients at the hospital until June 17. Schultz says he wasn’t happy with his contract requirements.

FIRST CASES OF MEASLES REPORTED IN COLORADO

DENVER (AP) – Colorado health officials have now confirmed two cases of measles in the Denver area in the first cases reported in the state since 2006. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment said Thursday that one case was confirmed in a man who traveled to Denver from India last month. That man was infectious when he visited the Dermatology and Laser Institute of Colorado in Lone Tree. Today the department said a second case of measles has been confirmed in a man who visited the same doctor’s office. State epidemiologist Lisa Miller says that man may have exposed others to the disease, and more cases could start popping up. In 2006, Colorado had a single confirmed case. Symptoms include a runny nose, rash, fever, cough and red, watery eyes.

This entry was posted in News. Bookmark the permalink.