News, March 12th

 

PARACHUTE OFFICIALS NERVOUS ABOUT LEASE MONEY

 

Parachute—Officials in the town of Parachute are worried they may have to fork over a large amount of money to the federal government because of a change in plans for drilling on the Roan Plateau.  According Town Administrator Bob Knight, if the Bureau of Land Management decides to redact the leases that were granted in 2008 in favor Environmental Impact Studies, the money will have to be repaid.  Knight says the town plans to approach state and federal lawmakers for advice.

 

EMERGENCY WILDFIRE FUNDS QUESTIONED BY GARFIELD COUNTY

 

Rifle—Garfield County may not contribute money to the Emergency Fire Fund next year.  Sheriff Lou Vallario says wildfires can burn up the fund in short order and there’s no guarantee Garfield County will benefit from it’s contribution.  Garfield County allotted over 60 thousand dollars to the 2013 fund to help offset the high cost of fighting wildfires. 

 

HOLMES’ ATTORNEY ENTERS NOT GUILTY PLEA

 

CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) – The judge in the deadly Colorado shooting case has entered a not guilty on behalf of James Holmes after his lawyer said he’s not ready to enter a plea.  The judge says Holmes can change his plea to not guilty by reason of insanity later, if he chooses.  If convicted, Holmes could be executed or spend the rest of his life in prison.   Holmes is charged with multiple counts of murder and attempted murder. Twelve people were killed and 70 wounded in the July 20 attack on moviegoers in Aurora.

 

CIVIL UNIONS BILL PASSED, HEADED TO GOVERNOR’S DESK

 

DENVER (AP) – A measure allowing civil unions for gay couples has cleared the Colorado Legislature and is headed to the governor’s desk, where it’s expected to be signed.  The bill won final passage Tuesday on a 39-26 House vote, with two Republicans joining all Democrats to approve it. Once the measure is signed, Colorado will join a dozen other states that have civil unions or similar laws. The bill’s approval marks a significant political shift in a western state that traditionally has had deep, conservative roots but has become more moderate over the past decade.  It was seven years ago that Colorado voters banned gay marriage. That means civil unions are the only option in the state, but a U.S. Supreme ruling on gay marriage laws could change that.

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