News, March 17th

SEARCH FOR MISSING DOCTOR IN VAIL CONTINUES

Vail, CO. (AP)–There’s still no sign of a missing Indiana doctor in the Vail backcountry.  Dr. James McGrogan disappeared  are searching for the man after he disappeared on a hiking trip with three friends near Vail.   His mother,Arlene McGrogan of Chesterton, Indiana, says her son recently returned to northern Indiana to work in the emergency department of St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in outside of South Bend.    Crews including two helicopters have been searching for McGrogan. The 39-year-old Chesterton native became separated from his group and hasn’t been seen since Friday afternoon.   Fellow hikers said McGrogan decided to continue ahead of his friends during a break on a hut trip to the Eiseman Hut, north of Vail. McGrogan had a large pack with food, water, medical supplies, a GPS and other tools.

NEW CASTLE MOURNS DEATH OF POLICE CHIEF

New Castle—The town of New Castle plans to honor the memory and years of service of Police Chief Chris Sadler.  Sadler collapsed Saturday and never regained consciousness.  The 52 year old law enforcement professional was pronounced dead at Grand River Hospital.  Sadler served 18 years in New Castle and was well known for his dedication to the local community and youth programs.  Town officials have expressed shock and grief and are planning a memorial service in his honor.  In the meantime, acting Police Chief Tony Pagni says a special fund in Chris Sadler’s name has been set up at Alpine Bank.

ADDITIONAL REC WEED REGS

DENVER (AP) – Colorado clarified its marijuana packaging requirements today, giving medical pot the same rules as pot for recreational pot.But Gov. John Hickenlooper says it’s too soon to consider a new law limiting potency or making other big changes to the marijuana market.The new law requires edible marijuana sold to medical marijuana patients to meet the same packaging standards as pot sold to recreational customers. The packaging must be opaque and childproof.Another new law signed Monday gives allows local governments that want to run criminal background checks on people working in the marijuana industry to submit fingerprints to the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. Everyone working in the industry already completes state-level background checks.

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