NEWS, NOVEMBER 14TH

Glenwood Springs–The Grand Avenue Bridge is a high priority project for the Colorado Department of Transportation. If you’d like to learn more about the plans to repair or replace the narrow, aging bridge, plan on attending a public open house tomorrow from 4:30 to 7 at the Glenwood Springs Community Center.

Rifle–Garfield County Sheriff’s deputies are looking for a man who led them on a brief, high-speed chase near Rifle the other night after refusing to pull over for a minor traffic violation. The man escaped on foot after crashing his vehicle Friday night.

Frisco/Boulder–High winds from Frisco to Boulder wreaked havoc over the weekend. Gusts ranging from 84 to 115 miles an hour fueled wildfires and knocked down trees.

Cortez–Western Slope Congressman Scott Tipton is objecting to a requirement that forces private water holders to sign their water rights over the U.S. Government as a permit condition.

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (AP) – Mesa County Clerk Sheila Reiner and
Jefferson County Clerk Pam Anderson are warning that some voters
can no longer expect secret ballots if new rules go into effect.
The clerks are worried that a recent court
ruling cannot be carried out. The Colorado Court of Appeals ruled in August that ballots are subject to the state’s open-records law and must be made public as
long as they don’t identify who cast them.
Clerks are worried that voters could still be identified despite
precautions.

FARM RULES
Farmers worry new child-labor rules will hurt

DENVER (AP) – Colorado family farmers are worried about a
proposal by the U.S. Department of Labor to change child-labor
laws. One would only allow kids under age 15 to work on their parent’s
farm. Another would keep children under age 16 from driving most
power equipment. Colorado Farm Bureau spokesman Shawn Martini says agriculture groups hope to persuade the Labor Department to amend its proposals.

OCCUPY DENVER
Denver police vow to enforce sidewalk rules

DENVER (AP) – Denver police are vowing to continue enforcing
sidewalk rules following a series of arrests over the weekend.
Police arrested 17 protesters on Saturday when officers cleared
the sidewalks of people who were camping out.
Three more protesters were arrested Sunday, where a Denver
police officer and a Colorado State Patrol trooper suffered minor
injuries in a shoving match over a table used to serve food. On Sunday A Denver judge increased the bail for the 17 people arrested
Saturday. Occupy arrests previously carried a maximum bail of $500.
On Sunday, they ranged from $750 to $1,000.

ELECTRIC BICYCLES
Critics want limits on electric bicycles

FORT COLLINS, Colo. (AP) – Joggers and hikers are asking the
Fort Collins City Council to bar electric bicycles from trails over
safety concerns. The council will take up a proposal on Tuesday that would allow
use of the bicycles on paved trails for a one-year trial. Supporters say the electric bicycles won’t jeopardize safety. Opponents say the bicycles can travel up
to 20 miles per hour and make trails more treacherous.

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