NEWS, NOVEMBER 15TH

Glenwood Springs–The new school board in the Roaring Fork Re-1 district is expected to make a decision soon about the future of Superintendent Judy Haptonstall. The board held a special meeting yesterday at Haptonstall’s request. She’s taken some criticism this year for some things including the dismissal of former Glenwood Springs Middle School Principal Sonya Hemmen.

Glenwood Springs–If you have an opinion or a concern about the replacement or repair of the Grand Avenue Bridge, plan on attending tonight’s open house. C-Dot engineers and planners will be on hand to answer questions from 4:30 to 7 at the Glenwood Springs Community Center.

Denver–Most state workers believe their jobs are important but according to a survey, many doubt they’ll ever get a promotion. The 200 thousand dollar survey, conducted by Governor John Hickenlooper’s administration showed that only 35 percent of state employees believed they had a chance at advancement.

Aspen–Former Aspen mayoral candidate Marilyn Marks has been hit with a tax lien from the state for over 55 thousand dollars in personal income taxes owed from 2007.

In other news…

ROCKY FORD, Colo. (AP) – Cantaloupe growers are asking Colorado
Agriculture Commissioner John Salazar to create a commission aimed
at improving consumer confidence in Rocky Ford cantaloupe following
an outbreak of listeria blamed for the deaths of 29 people.
They also want the state to clarify that not all cantaloupe from
the region was contaminated. The Food and Drug Administration says the contamination occurred at a packing facility in Granada, about 84 miles east of Rocky Ford. Salazar met with the farmers on Monday and discussed making Rocky Ford melons a certified brand name.

OCCUPY DENVER
Taxpayer costs mount for protests
DENVER (AP) – Denver police say anti-Wall Street protests cost
taxpayers more than $360,000 for the first few weeks of last month,
and the costs keep rising. City officials say they won’t know the full cost until later this week. Officials say the funds were needed to pay for police, sheriff’s
officers, public works, environmental health and Denver Health
officials.

ST MALO FIRE
Catholic retreat fire still smoldering
ALLENSPARK, Colo. (AP) – Four fire departments are still working
to put out hot spots at a fire that heavily damaged a conference
center at a retreat once visited by Pope John Paul II.
Boulder County Sheriff’s spokesman Rick Brough (BRUFF) said
Tuesday a multiagency team led by the Boulder County Sheriff’s
Office is investigating the cause of the fire. The team includes
the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. Brough said
the cause was unknown, but investigators were looking at a
fireplace used by workers at the retreat. About 70 firefighters brought the blaze under control several hours after it erupted Monday morning.
No guests were at the St. Malo Retreat Center Monday.
Electricity had been cut over the weekend by high winds, prompting
the retreat to send guests home.

 

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