News, November 7th

HEMP REGULATIONS APPROVED

DENVER (AP) – Colorado has proposed regulations for legal hemp growing.  The regulations adopted Wednesday call for farmers to register and pay a $200 annual fee. They also will pay $1 per acre planted. Farms will be subject to inspections to make sure that the hemp plants limit the amount of a chemical that makes users stoned. Potential growers are still worried because it could violate federal laws.   Hemp and its oil-rich seeds have dozens of uses in foods, cosmetics, textiles and construction materials. Amendment 64, the 2012 Colorado ballot initiative that legalized marijuana, also provided for state licensing of hemp farming.

GJ AIRPORT INVESTIGATED BY FBI FOR FRAUD

GRAND JUNCTION(AP) – Grand Junction airport administrators say they’ve been ordered to turn over financial records as part of an FBI investigation.The FBI conducted a search of the airport’s offices on Wednesday as part of what it said was an ongoing investigation into alleged fraud by the administration.The chairman of the authority’s board, Denny Granum, says the board hasn’t been informed of the purpose of the investigation. He says the authority would fully cooperate with investigators so it can be completed as soon as possible.The FBI wouldn’t release any additional details Thursday. The search warrant affidavit and other documents in the case are sealed.

GJ COUPLE SENTENCED FOR WELFARE FRAUD

GRAND JUNCTION (AP) – A former Mesa County Department of Human Services caseworker and her husband have been sentenced to jail terms for welfare fraud.
Venica Padilla was sentenced to 30 days in the Mesa County jail, while her husband, Tony Padilla Jr., was given a 90-day sentence on Wednesday.The Padillas were charged in 2011 with defrauding an adoption subsidy program of more than $53,000 by claiming they were financially supporting two adopted daughters between September 2003 and November 2009. Investigators determined the girls were not living in their home.
Tony Padilla received a longer jail sentence because he had been convicted of four prior felonies.

ANTI-FRACKING VOTE STILL UP IN THE AIR IN BROOMFIELD

BROOMFIELD (AP) – The results of Broomfield’s fracking vote won’t be known until at least later this month and it could be determined by a recount.The proposed five-year hydraulic fracturing ban fell 13 votes short of passing in Tuesday night’s initial count. However, the tally won’t be official until all overseas and military ballots, provisional ballots and other ballots with problems like missing signatures are counted and certified by Nov. 19.Depending on how close the margin is then, there could be a recount -either a state-mandated one or one requested and paid for by citizens. County clerk Jim Candalarie (CAN’-dah-lair-ee) says that would take two or three days.Overseas and military voters have until Wednesday to get their ballots in. In addition, 363 faulty ballots could be counted.

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