NEWS

CROWDED FIELD OF CANDIDATES FOR GW COUNCIL

Glenwood Springs—Former Glenwood Springs city council members Shelly Kaup, Don Gillespie and Rick Davis are seeking a return to local politics.  They are among 10 candidates campaigning for three open seats on the council. Davis and Kaup are running for the At-Large seat along with Munro Wilcox, Jonathan Gorst and local attorney and Downtown Development Authority member Charlie Willman.  Gillespie is running for the open seat representing Ward 5 and will be challenged by Early Childhood Network Director Jonathan Godes as well as Glenwood natives Sarah Gordon and Amber Wissing.  Rick Voorhees is running unopposed in Ward 2.  Glenwood Springs’ municipal election is April 4th.

VOTER SELFIES OK’D BY HOUSE COMMITTEE

Denver—If you really feel compelled to post a picture of yourself casting a ballot on election day, Colorado lawmakers say, “cheese.”  The House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee approved a bill that would legalize posting ballot selfies on social media. The bill’s sponsors, Democrat Paul Rosenthal and Republican Dave Williams rejected a request by Deputy Secretary of State Suzanne Staiert to ban vote trading.  The practice involves voters, often from other states, exchanging promises to vote a certain way and using selfies to prove it.  Williams and Rosenthal say the measure protects voters’ First Amendment rights.  The committee voted 8 to 1 to send the bill to the full House for consideration.

FULL DAY KINDERGARTEN FUNDING CONSIDERED

Denver—Funding public education in Colorado is going to be a struggle for state lawmakers this year but they have to start somewhere.  The Senate State, Veterans and Military Affairs committee approved a bill to fund full day kindergarten.  the committee took testimony from teachers, principals and parents speaking in favor of the bill. Educator Carrie Vanway says having youngsters in the classroom for a full day rather than just a few hours in the morning can make a big difference in their development.  Senate Bill 29 was passed by the committee on a 3 to 2 vote.

STATE USING BAIT TO LURE WILDLIFE AWAY FROM HIGHWAYS

Grand Junction—To keep hungry mule deer and elk from getting dangerously close to highways, state wildlife officials are using bait to lure them into safe places.  Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials began putting food out in the Gunnison Basin near Highway 50.  The hope is to reduce the need for the animals to wander off in search of food and also cut down on the number of vehicle-wildlife collisions.  The baiting program is in response to the significant snowfall this winter.  Over four feet of snow has accumulated along the highway and low elevations that are important winter range for mule deer.