News, November 21st

MORE TIME FOR SOUTH BRIDGE COMMENTS

Glenwood Springs—The deadline to submit comments on the South Bridge project for Glenwood Springs has been extended to Friday, December 6th.  The original deadline was today but based on the level of public interest and the attendance at a recent hearing, the city has decided to give people more time to offer an opinion.   The preferred alternative for the South Bridge, identified in the environmental assessment, is 10b which would connect Airport Road to Highway 82 south of the Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport.  You can take a closer look at the design by visiting the project website at glenwoodsouthbridge.net.

OFFICIALS STILL TRYING TO ID PILOT OF CRASHED, ASPEN-BOUND PLANE

Delta—-The name of the pilot killed when his Aspen-bound Cessna crashed outside Cedaredge two nights ago still hasn’t been released.  The Delta County Coroner’s Office says they’re having to rely on dental records to make a positive identification.  They do know he was from California.  Authorities say by the time they got to the crash site at the base of the Grand Mesa, the 1978 Cessna was completely engulfed in flames and the tail number was unreadable.  Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board are still trying to determine the cause of the crash. 

NEW DRILLING REGS DISCUSSED TODAY

Denver—Oil and gas industry officials and environmentalists are discussing the proposed new rules for drilling and air quality standards.  The rules, unveiled earlier this week by Governor John Hickenlooper, have to be approved by Colorado Air Quality Control Commission.  The focus is on emissions of methane and other chemicals as well as increased monitoring of wells to detect and respond to leaks much sooner.  The monitoring would involve the use of infrared cameras which would cost the industry about 30 million dollars.

DIA WORKING TO STAY OPEN DURING STORM

Denver— The National Weather Service has issued winter storm warnings in southwest Colorado and hazardous weather watches elsewhere as light snow moved across the state on Thursday.Denver International Airport officials say about 140 pieces of snow removal equipment are working on the airfield to prevent snow from accumulating on runways, taxiways and ramps as several airlines canceled flights. The airport handles about 1,650 flights a day.The Colorado Department of Transportation ordered tire chain laws on major mountain passes, but traffic spokesman Mark Aultman said no major roads have been closed due to snow.